Groton Residents:

While there is no imminent threat of a cyanobacteria outbreak on our lakes and ponds, the referenced short story and photograph, together with a CDC frequently asked questions will help you recognize what to look for if you bring your pets down to the shoreline. I have seen a small amount of the green “slime” in a cove near me, but it was dissipated by the wind, the same day, and has not come back.

The Great Pond Advisory Committee (GPAC) and the Groton Lakes Association (GLA) are discussing a testing program that we may implement going forward. GPAC has set aside funds for this testing should it become necessary. We are also asking our consultant SOLitude and the Nashoba Associated Boards of Health for guidance.

Cyanobacteria can appear in any lake at any time and has been observed in Lost Lake/Knops Pond, but not in any threatening amounts. We just want people to be aware of it. We will continue to monitor. If someone sees a large amount of what the article’s photograph depicts, please feel free to contact us on our Facebook page.

Keeping Your Dog Safe from Toxic Blue-Green Algae

What to do if you think your dog has been exposed to deadly cyanobacteria
By Angela Nelson | August 30, 2019
When we see green, scummy water, we know better than to drink it or even swim in it. But the same is not true for many dogs, and that green scum could be a toxic blue-green algae bloom, which can be fatal to animals.

Several dogs have died this summer after swimming in water contaminated by blue-green algae. Most of the deaths have been in southern U.S. states such as North Carolina, Texas, Tennessee, and Georgia. However, dog deaths in Minnesota and Colorado also are suspected to be the result of toxic blue-green algae.

Toxic algae blooms can occur throughout the U.S. and Canada, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. They come in different colors, including red and brown, and can occur in fresh or salt water. The blue-green algae making headlines recently is also known as cyanobacteria.
Read the entire article:
https://now.tufts.edu/articles/keeping-your-dog-safe-toxic-blue-green-algae